Tuesday, 13 April 2010

A republican disgrace Down Under

A foolish example of creeping republicanism has turned into a major incident in Australia.  God Save The Queen, the Royal Anthem we share, has been brazenly banished from the Melbourne Anzac Day service on April 25th.  Most of our members are probably unfamiliar with Anzac Day, but it is a significant day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand to honour members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (Anzac) who fought in the battle of Gallipoli in Turkey during the First World War.

The Returned and Services League of Australia (the Australian equivalent to the Royal Canadian Legion) organizes Anzac Day services.  The RSL in the state of Victoria - aptly named after Queen Victoria - has dropped God Save The Queen from its Melbourne dawn service, resulting in a massive outcry amongst Australians.

Both major monarchist organizations in Australia - Australians For Constitutional Monarchy and the Australian Monarchist League - are leading the fight in the hopes that such a distasteful move can be reversed.

Here is an excllent post by ACM's National Convenor David Flint that explains why GSTQ has been dropped.  The reason?  That some people the organizers asked felt GSTQ was irrelevant.

Canadian monarchists know all too well the tactics of republicans.  When they can't get their way, they resort to removing and hiding visual evidence of the Crown.  Their hope is that by making the monarchy disappear people will simply forget about it and one day wake up as republicans.  Republicans know that they can't win the constitutional debate, so they are left performing the same tiresome, predictable, often childish stunts like this latest one Down Under.

Of course, we monarchists don't have to sit back.  In a previous post, I suggested we go on the offensive and beat the republicans at their own game.  It's called creeping monarchism and it works!

Until next time,
Robert.

Monday, 12 April 2010

The Great Governor General Guessing Game


Since Easter weekend, the national media have been in a tizzy over who will become the next Governor General of Canada. Never has there been so much interest in and speculation surrounding the issue of a vice-regal appointment. Perhaps, it is a testament to the popularity of MichaĆ«lle Jean. Or, that - thanks to two controversial prorogations - Canadians suddenly realise that the Governor General is much more than a mere figurehead. Or, maybe it is simply the information age we live in with the demand for news 24/7. Truthfully, it’s probably a combination of all three.

Such media attention, I believe, is very positive. Yes, I wish some journalists would do their homework and stop erroneously reporting that Mme Jean’s “term is up” and that “the Prime Minister likely won’t appoint her to a second term” (Civics 101. Governors General don’t serve “terms”. They’re appointed by The Queen on the advice of the Prime Minister and serve at The Queen’s pleasure. ) But, I am thankful that the media folk are actually talking about the office and its role. The Canadian Monarchy is in the news, and that’s a good thing.

There have been some wonderful names suggested. Some more seriously than others. Facebook campaigns have popped up asking people to support one person or another. And, the response to the League’s own Facebook page, Canada’s Next Governor General, has been fantastic.

When asked what qualifications the League believes a Governor General should possess, I am quite frank. We are rather flexible, really. All we ask is that he or she be a monarchist, understand and respect the role, and be non-partisan.

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Here's a juxtaposition to think about.  If Canadian republicans argue that the Governor General is the head of state, then why do they say we need to abolish the monarchy in order to have a Canadian head of state?

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This coming Sunday, I will be joining the League’s Kingston branch to celebrate The Queen’s 84th birthday as well as the League’s 40th anniversary. Next month, I will attend the Ottawa branch’s dinner to celebrate the same. I look forward to seeing many of you once again while welcoming the opportunity to meet others for the first time. One of my favourite things about being the League’s Dominion Chairman is meeting so many of our members. I hope to see you there.

Until next time,
Robert.